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Suzie's Pastry Shoppe/Yelp

Where to Find Crispy, Flaky Baklava In Houston

Stuffed with pistachios or made into cheesecake, these are the best baklava bets in town

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Beloved around the world, baklava is a lot like beer in that it refers not to a single type of pastry, but to an entire classification of sweets. Though it’s understood that the dish will typically contain some combination of phyllo dough and nuts drenched in syrup, baklava can mean anything from a fat triangle stuffed with walnuts, to a flaky square full of pistachios.

Various renditions of the sweet treat claim roots in Greece, Turkey, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East dating back hundreds if not thousands of years. That rich and lengthy history has produced a number of variations, many of which are available right here in Space City.

From classic versions of layered baklava, to mind-blowing mashups like baklava cheesecake, this map features a delightful assortment of pastry shops just begging to be sampled.

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Silk Road Grill

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Hazelnut filling and chocolate drizzle make Silk Road Grill’s chocolate baklava something akin to a Nutella treat that tickles tastebuds with a crunch. Or, get tropical with the coconut baklava, a true-to-its-name concoction stuffed and topped with coconut.

Silk Road Grill/Yelp

Hugs & Donuts

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Just when it seemed like donuts couldn’t stray any further from chocolate and sprinkles, Hugs & Donuts dropped the baklava donut. Crushed phyllo tops a cake donut soaked in orange blossom syrup and cardamom.

Hugs & Donuts/Yelp

Helen in the Heights

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Scream for ice cream with a bourbon baklava soft serve, available for $5 during happy hour at Helen’s in the Heights. Honey hardens just enough to tack a salted pecan topping to the dome of a booze-infused frozen treat. Those who want dessert without the whiskey can get down on a sundae made with pecan baklava and homemade soft serve, available at both locations.

Helen in the Heights/Facebook

Phoenicia Specialty Foods

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Pistachio baklava, chocolate baklava, and fruity baklava are just a few of the 20-something baklava varieties available at the four Phoenicia locations. For an extra special treat, head downtown to Phoenicia's MKT BAR and order the apple baklava. Warmed in a skillet and served with a heap of snickerdoodle ice cream, the apple baklava makes apple pie look like peasant food.

Phoenicia Specialty Foods/Facebook

Harry's Restaurant & Cafe

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Baklava is fit for breakfast at Harry’s in Montrose. Diners longing for a sweet start can kick off the day with baklava French toast: a dish of griddle-fried challah bread and spiced walnut filling. Skip the fork and grab a spoon to scoop up the side of honey ice cream made with Greek yogurt.

Harry's Restaurant & Cafe/Yelp

Zabak's Mediterranean Cafe

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For those who cannot conceive of baklava without a falafel antecedent will enjoy snack time at Zabak’s Mediterranean Cafe, where the menu pays homage to the Zabak family's collection of Palestinian recipes. For less than $5, crunch into a couple of crispy falafel seasoned with coriander before chowing down on a hunk of walnut or pistachio baklava.

Zabak's Mediterranean Cafe/Yelp (Kenny Haner Photography)

Suzie's Pastry Shoppe

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Baklava’s sweetness gives it plenty of space to stand alone as a dessert, but what happens when it merges with another traditional favorite? To find out, place an order for baklava cheesecake at Suzie’s Pastry Shoppe. For a snack-sized delight, try the green baklava: a roll of pistachio-filled phyllo curled around a cashew cluster.

Suzie's Pastry Shoppe/Facebook

Abdallah's Bakery

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Lady finger baklava share a space in the display case with squares of walnut-stuffed phyllo and bird’s nest bundles of whole pistachios. The shapes and nut fillings vary, but all are held together with rosewater syrup, a glue that keeps them true to Lebanese form.

Abdallah's Lebanese Bakery and Restaurant/Facebook

Pasha Restaurant

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Stacks of paper-thin phyllo pile around a layer of walnuts doused in syrup at Pasha, where Turkish-style baklava is served with a side of cream. The combination of lightness and density results in a textural tango that’s not to be missed.

Pasha Restaurant/Yelp

Dimassi's Mediterranean Buffet

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Though it’s hard to resist filling up on shawarma and sides at Dimassi’s Mediterranean Buffet, make sure to leave room for a plate of phyllo stuffed with cream or walnuts. Both varieties of baklava are drizzled with honey, and it’s been said honey is good for digestion.

Dimassi's Mediterranean Buffet/Facebook

Anonymous Cafe

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Lone Star savory meets Greek traditional at Anonymous Bakery, where flavors from across the world mingle in a single bite of baklava. A blend of almonds, walnuts, and Texas pecans come together in one honey-soaked pastry that drives locals nuts.

Anonymous Cafe/Yelp

Bakkhus Taverna

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Who doesn’t love the thought of baklava by the beach? A stroll away from the Kemah Boardwalk, Bakkhus Taverna sells a slice of pecan-stuffed phyllo that proves there’s no wrong place to enjoy baklava.

Bakkhus Taverna/Yelp

Silk Road Grill

Hazelnut filling and chocolate drizzle make Silk Road Grill’s chocolate baklava something akin to a Nutella treat that tickles tastebuds with a crunch. Or, get tropical with the coconut baklava, a true-to-its-name concoction stuffed and topped with coconut.

Silk Road Grill/Yelp

Hugs & Donuts

Just when it seemed like donuts couldn’t stray any further from chocolate and sprinkles, Hugs & Donuts dropped the baklava donut. Crushed phyllo tops a cake donut soaked in orange blossom syrup and cardamom.

Hugs & Donuts/Yelp

Helen in the Heights

Scream for ice cream with a bourbon baklava soft serve, available for $5 during happy hour at Helen’s in the Heights. Honey hardens just enough to tack a salted pecan topping to the dome of a booze-infused frozen treat. Those who want dessert without the whiskey can get down on a sundae made with pecan baklava and homemade soft serve, available at both locations.

Helen in the Heights/Facebook

Phoenicia Specialty Foods

Pistachio baklava, chocolate baklava, and fruity baklava are just a few of the 20-something baklava varieties available at the four Phoenicia locations. For an extra special treat, head downtown to Phoenicia's MKT BAR and order the apple baklava. Warmed in a skillet and served with a heap of snickerdoodle ice cream, the apple baklava makes apple pie look like peasant food.

Phoenicia Specialty Foods/Facebook

Harry's Restaurant & Cafe

Baklava is fit for breakfast at Harry’s in Montrose. Diners longing for a sweet start can kick off the day with baklava French toast: a dish of griddle-fried challah bread and spiced walnut filling. Skip the fork and grab a spoon to scoop up the side of honey ice cream made with Greek yogurt.

Harry's Restaurant & Cafe/Yelp

Zabak's Mediterranean Cafe

For those who cannot conceive of baklava without a falafel antecedent will enjoy snack time at Zabak’s Mediterranean Cafe, where the menu pays homage to the Zabak family's collection of Palestinian recipes. For less than $5, crunch into a couple of crispy falafel seasoned with coriander before chowing down on a hunk of walnut or pistachio baklava.

Zabak's Mediterranean Cafe/Yelp (Kenny Haner Photography)

Suzie's Pastry Shoppe

Baklava’s sweetness gives it plenty of space to stand alone as a dessert, but what happens when it merges with another traditional favorite? To find out, place an order for baklava cheesecake at Suzie’s Pastry Shoppe. For a snack-sized delight, try the green baklava: a roll of pistachio-filled phyllo curled around a cashew cluster.

Suzie's Pastry Shoppe/Facebook

Abdallah's Bakery

Lady finger baklava share a space in the display case with squares of walnut-stuffed phyllo and bird’s nest bundles of whole pistachios. The shapes and nut fillings vary, but all are held together with rosewater syrup, a glue that keeps them true to Lebanese form.

Abdallah's Lebanese Bakery and Restaurant/Facebook

Pasha Restaurant

Stacks of paper-thin phyllo pile around a layer of walnuts doused in syrup at Pasha, where Turkish-style baklava is served with a side of cream. The combination of lightness and density results in a textural tango that’s not to be missed.

Pasha Restaurant/Yelp

Dimassi's Mediterranean Buffet

Though it’s hard to resist filling up on shawarma and sides at Dimassi’s Mediterranean Buffet, make sure to leave room for a plate of phyllo stuffed with cream or walnuts. Both varieties of baklava are drizzled with honey, and it’s been said honey is good for digestion.

Dimassi's Mediterranean Buffet/Facebook

Anonymous Cafe

Lone Star savory meets Greek traditional at Anonymous Bakery, where flavors from across the world mingle in a single bite of baklava. A blend of almonds, walnuts, and Texas pecans come together in one honey-soaked pastry that drives locals nuts.

Anonymous Cafe/Yelp

Bakkhus Taverna

Who doesn’t love the thought of baklava by the beach? A stroll away from the Kemah Boardwalk, Bakkhus Taverna sells a slice of pecan-stuffed phyllo that proves there’s no wrong place to enjoy baklava.

Bakkhus Taverna/Yelp

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