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A plethora of Marmo’s steak offerings.
Houston is certainly a steak city.
Kirsten Gilliam

20 Must-Try Steaks in Houston

When in search of the city's best rib-eyes, filets, and porterhouses, Georgia James, Marmo, and Patton’s have you covered

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Houston is certainly a steak city.
| Kirsten Gilliam

As Houston’s dining scene continues to grow and diversify, the city is still one of the United States’ great steak destinations. The city continues to offer plenty of restaurants that serve up classic slabs of beef, grilled over wood or seared to perfection in a cast-iron pan, alongside steakhouse sides and indulgent desserts.

This means searching for Houston’s best steaks turns up so many good options that it can be difficult to decide where to dine, but Eater Houston has strived to narrow it down. Whether in search of a massive, bone-in rib-eye carved at the table or an endlessly tender filet mignon, there’s a bevy of restaurant stalwarts and newcomers, like Georgia James and Marmo, that are waiting to make the meatiest of dreams come true.

Check out these 20 Houston steakhouses that serve up the city’s best cuts of beef at a variety of price points that will satisfy big wigs and ballers on a budget alike.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Chef Austin Simmons’s devotion to presenting the best possible steaks at Tris has led to its evolution as a modern meat restaurant. Protein from Gyulais, Heartbrand X, and Snake River Farms are available here, making the restaurant’s steak boards a prime choice for carnivorous diners. Each board is custom-prepared for the table with a variety of wet and dry-aged meats paired with Simmons’s selection of sauces. 

Patton's Steakhouse

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Make fulfilling your hankering for steak a secret mission at this new speakeasy-style restaurant. Tucked behind Height’s Savoir, guests will enter through a wine cellar and will be seated in the dining room, which takes on a moody yet classic decor with leather banquettes and white tablecloths. Just as timeless is the menu, which features a variety of strips, filets, rib-eyes, seabass, and more.

Patton’s bone-in rib-eye, sliced and served with a roll.
Ordering steak Patton’s Steakhouse, which seats up to 38 guests, feels exclusive.
Barrett Doke

Taste of Texas

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As one of the country’s highest-volume steakhouses, this beloved Houston restaurant is a reliable choice for steaks plus all of the delicious sides, salads, and desserts to go along with ‘em. Bone-in cowboy rib-eye, porterhouse, and tomahawk steaks are on offer, all ranging from $40 to $80.

B & B Butchers

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As one of only a few restaurants in the country that serve up legit, certified Japanese Kobe beef, B&B Butchers is a must if you’re seeking the city’s fanciest steak. Blow a paycheck on A5 Kobe beef, or consider the more economical 22-ounce bone-in rib-eye that clocks in at $68. Dining alone? A petit filet topped with fried oysters and bleu cheese (a.k.a. the “carpet bagger”) is an ideal option.

Brenner's on the Bayou

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Brenner’s has served the city’s finest beef to generations of Houstonians. USDA Prime rib-eye, filet, and NY strip are all equally compelling options, especially when topped with smoked garlic butter or a rich and velvety cognac-peppercorn sauce. Celebrating something? With unparalleled views of Buffalo Bayou, Brenner’s serves as the quintessential destination steakhouse for special occasions.

Guard and Grace

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With elegant decor and a sneak peek of its open kitchen, Guard and Grace serves up superb steaks and an unmatched dining experience with exquisite service to boot. Can’t choose between the rib-eye and the New York strip? Go for the juicy porterhouse. This best-of-both-worlds cut pairs well with sides like the rich black truffle mac and cheese or the crispy Brussel sprouts.

Vic & Anthony's Steakhouse

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This Downtown Houston steakhouse is a favorite of power brokers and professionals, but plebes won’t feel too out of place in this cozy upscale dining room. Dig into traditional USDA Prime steaks on or off the bone with an array of complements like roasted bone marrow, blue cheese bacon butter, or a classic bearnaise. Or, try the Texas Akaushi skirt steak, grilled & served with duck fat potatoes, fried egg, and chimichurri sauce.

Georgia James Steak

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Underbelly Hospitality’s steakhouse returns — this time, in Regent Square with the tried and true cast-iron steaks, whether it be a cut of Japanese W5 wagyu or a Texas strip from 44 Farms, plus Viet-Cajun oysters and smashed and fried potatoes. Dining with a group? Order the baller board, which comes with a platter of James’ best dishes customized for the crew.

Mastro's Steakhouse

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With a dynamic waterfront terrace, vibrant lounge, and close proximity to the lavish Post Oak Hotel, this ritzy steakhouse is a high-spirited destination to settle in for steak night. Splurge on a wagyu tomahawk or Japanese A5 wagyu before digging into the famed butter cake.

Turner's

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Under the Berg Hospitality umbrella (B&B Butchers and the Butcher Shop), Turner’s serves as a fool-proof destination for a prime steak. Try the wagyu filet or indulge wholly with the 22 oz wagyu rib-eye.

A newcomer to the Montrose Collective, this Italian chophouse offers delicious pasta and premium hand-cut steaks, including an 18-ounce cowboy rib-eye and a 42-ounce Porterhouse, both of which have been dry-aged for 45 days. Decide between toppings like a porcini bone marrow sauce or rosemary-aged beef fat butter, and accompany your steak with a side like roasted potatoes and broccolini. Don’t forget to browse the 22-page wine list for the perfect red.

Marmo’s 18-ounce cowboy rib-eye, with lemon and garlic.
Marmo’s 18-ounce rib-eye is dry-aged for 45 days.
Kirsten Gilliam

Killen's STQ

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Part steakhouse, part barbecue destination (hence the name STQ), chef Ronnie Killen brings some of the best offerings, made famous at his steakhouse and barbecue joint in Pearland, into Houston city limits. Keep it traditional with Killen’s 14-ounce dry-aged New York strip or consider the decadent chicken-fried rib-eye.

Steak 48

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This buzzy steakhouse with a prime location within River Oaks District is a spot to see and be seen while eating massive slabs of meat. The restaurant takes a modern approach to steakhouse dining, featuring responsibly sourced wet-aged cuts selected and deconstructed by its master butcher and broiled at 1,600 degrees. Expect indulgent accompaniments from truffle green peppercorn and sauteed blue cheese to foie gras and appetizing sides like corn crème brûlée. Love a good surf ‘n’ turf? Stray from tradition and bask in the luxury of an American wagyu filet with black truffle-sauteed Maine lobster.

Steak 48’s steak topped with truffle sautéed Maine lobster.
Make your steak extra special at Steak 48 with indulgent toppings like truffle sauteed lobster.
Steak 48

Truluck's

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Though best known for its giant crab claws, Truluck’s is also known to serve up a melt-in-your-mouth steak, including a New York strip that’s wet-aged for 60 days, and a barrel cut filet, in a romantic ambiance, complete with live music from a piano. Also packing the flavor is the off-the-menu bone-in rib-eye, which is offered on a first-come, first-serve basis. an

Doris Metropolitan Houston

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A New Orleans export, Doris Metropolitan brings plenty of flair and lots of flavor to Space City. Dig into steaks that are dry-aged at the restaurant, ranging from a 9-ounce “classified cut” to the hulking 34-ounce porterhouse. Wagyu beef from Japan and Texas are also on offer, and don’t sleep on the sides — from asparagus gratin to Israeli salad with tahini.

Chama Gaúcha

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A steakhouse list isn’t complete without a Brazilian steakhouse, and at Chama, the meats keep coming. So long as your service button is switched from red to green, trained chefs will greet you with skewers of meat, including prime cuts of sirloin, pork ribs and loins, linguica, lamb, and filet mignon — all charcoal-grilled and sliced before your eyes.

Pappas Bros. Steakhouse

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As the O.G. of Houston’s steak scene, there’s no better service or steak in town than at this Westheimer institution. The beef is USDA Prime and aged in-house, the wine list is ridiculously comprehensive, and starters like Pappas’ iconic turtle soup and lobster mac and cheese offer an excellent complement to a rib-eye, NY strip, or filet.

Gatsby's

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Located near Houston’s Museum District, Gatbsy’s is helmed by executive chef Erick Anaya who brings more than 20 years of steakhouse experience to the table. Start with the deluxe deviled eggs topped with fried shrimp and bacon jam or baked oysters on the half shell before diving into a delightful menu of plenty turf. Opt for the 16-ounce Delmonico steak, two cuts of rib-eye, or the Gatsby’s chicken, and pair with a side or two. You can’t miss with the lobster mac and cheese and onion rings.

Gatsby’s plated rib-eye with a glass of red wine.
Gatbsy’s harnesses the expertise of its executive chef Erick Anaya to serve some of the best steaks the city has to offer.
Gatsby’s Prime Steakhouse

The steak menu is strong at Tony’s, in part due to many loyal cooks who have prepared meat at the restaurant during its 35 years. The 55-day dry-aged rib-eye is 100 percent prime, and its artisan-style dry-aging process results in a buttery, full-flavored bite, but there is also the option to have it “Tony’s Way” which includes porcini mushroom, fonda Bruno sauce, and roasted bone marrow. On the hunt for something extravagant? Find fatty A5, BMS 12 Miyazaki wagyu beef here, presented seared and sliced by the ounce.

Killen's Steakhouse

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Chef Ronnie Killen’s steakhouse — with locations in Pearland and in the Woodlands — is an absolute staple. Traditional dry or wet-aged Prime corn-fed beef, wagyu, and grass-fed steaks are on the menu, and a flight of New York strip allows diners to try a variety of beefy options. Don’t forget to save room for mouthwatering sides like skillet potatoes and broccoli-cheese risotto.

TRIS

Chef Austin Simmons’s devotion to presenting the best possible steaks at Tris has led to its evolution as a modern meat restaurant. Protein from Gyulais, Heartbrand X, and Snake River Farms are available here, making the restaurant’s steak boards a prime choice for carnivorous diners. Each board is custom-prepared for the table with a variety of wet and dry-aged meats paired with Simmons’s selection of sauces. 

Patton's Steakhouse

Patton’s bone-in rib-eye, sliced and served with a roll.
Ordering steak Patton’s Steakhouse, which seats up to 38 guests, feels exclusive.
Barrett Doke

Make fulfilling your hankering for steak a secret mission at this new speakeasy-style restaurant. Tucked behind Height’s Savoir, guests will enter through a wine cellar and will be seated in the dining room, which takes on a moody yet classic decor with leather banquettes and white tablecloths. Just as timeless is the menu, which features a variety of strips, filets, rib-eyes, seabass, and more.

Patton’s bone-in rib-eye, sliced and served with a roll.
Ordering steak Patton’s Steakhouse, which seats up to 38 guests, feels exclusive.
Barrett Doke

Taste of Texas

As one of the country’s highest-volume steakhouses, this beloved Houston restaurant is a reliable choice for steaks plus all of the delicious sides, salads, and desserts to go along with ‘em. Bone-in cowboy rib-eye, porterhouse, and tomahawk steaks are on offer, all ranging from $40 to $80.

B & B Butchers

As one of only a few restaurants in the country that serve up legit, certified Japanese Kobe beef, B&B Butchers is a must if you’re seeking the city’s fanciest steak. Blow a paycheck on A5 Kobe beef, or consider the more economical 22-ounce bone-in rib-eye that clocks in at $68. Dining alone? A petit filet topped with fried oysters and bleu cheese (a.k.a. the “carpet bagger”) is an ideal option.

Brenner's on the Bayou

Brenner’s has served the city’s finest beef to generations of Houstonians. USDA Prime rib-eye, filet, and NY strip are all equally compelling options, especially when topped with smoked garlic butter or a rich and velvety cognac-peppercorn sauce. Celebrating something? With unparalleled views of Buffalo Bayou, Brenner’s serves as the quintessential destination steakhouse for special occasions.

Guard and Grace

With elegant decor and a sneak peek of its open kitchen, Guard and Grace serves up superb steaks and an unmatched dining experience with exquisite service to boot. Can’t choose between the rib-eye and the New York strip? Go for the juicy porterhouse. This best-of-both-worlds cut pairs well with sides like the rich black truffle mac and cheese or the crispy Brussel sprouts.

Vic & Anthony's Steakhouse

This Downtown Houston steakhouse is a favorite of power brokers and professionals, but plebes won’t feel too out of place in this cozy upscale dining room. Dig into traditional USDA Prime steaks on or off the bone with an array of complements like roasted bone marrow, blue cheese bacon butter, or a classic bearnaise. Or, try the Texas Akaushi skirt steak, grilled & served with duck fat potatoes, fried egg, and chimichurri sauce.

Georgia James Steak

Underbelly Hospitality’s steakhouse returns — this time, in Regent Square with the tried and true cast-iron steaks, whether it be a cut of Japanese W5 wagyu or a Texas strip from 44 Farms, plus Viet-Cajun oysters and smashed and fried potatoes. Dining with a group? Order the baller board, which comes with a platter of James’ best dishes customized for the crew.

Mastro's Steakhouse

With a dynamic waterfront terrace, vibrant lounge, and close proximity to the lavish Post Oak Hotel, this ritzy steakhouse is a high-spirited destination to settle in for steak night. Splurge on a wagyu tomahawk or Japanese A5 wagyu before digging into the famed butter cake.

Turner's

Under the Berg Hospitality umbrella (B&B Butchers and the Butcher Shop), Turner’s serves as a fool-proof destination for a prime steak. Try the wagyu filet or indulge wholly with the 22 oz wagyu rib-eye.

Marmo

Marmo’s 18-ounce cowboy rib-eye, with lemon and garlic.
Marmo’s 18-ounce rib-eye is dry-aged for 45 days.
Kirsten Gilliam

A newcomer to the Montrose Collective, this Italian chophouse offers delicious pasta and premium hand-cut steaks, including an 18-ounce cowboy rib-eye and a 42-ounce Porterhouse, both of which have been dry-aged for 45 days. Decide between toppings like a porcini bone marrow sauce or rosemary-aged beef fat butter, and accompany your steak with a side like roasted potatoes and broccolini. Don’t forget to browse the 22-page wine list for the perfect red.

Marmo’s 18-ounce cowboy rib-eye, with lemon and garlic.
Marmo’s 18-ounce rib-eye is dry-aged for 45 days.
Kirsten Gilliam

Killen's STQ

Part steakhouse, part barbecue destination (hence the name STQ), chef Ronnie Killen brings some of the best offerings, made famous at his steakhouse and barbecue joint in Pearland, into Houston city limits. Keep it traditional with Killen’s 14-ounce dry-aged New York strip or consider the decadent chicken-fried rib-eye.

Steak 48

Steak 48’s steak topped with truffle sautéed Maine lobster.
Make your steak extra special at Steak 48 with indulgent toppings like truffle sauteed lobster.
Steak 48

This buzzy steakhouse with a prime location within River Oaks District is a spot to see and be seen while eating massive slabs of meat. The restaurant takes a modern approach to steakhouse dining, featuring responsibly sourced wet-aged cuts selected and deconstructed by its master butcher and broiled at 1,600 degrees. Expect indulgent accompaniments from truffle green peppercorn and sauteed blue cheese to foie gras and appetizing sides like corn crème brûlée. Love a good surf ‘n’ turf? Stray from tradition and bask in the luxury of an American wagyu filet with black truffle-sauteed Maine lobster.

Steak 48’s steak topped with truffle sautéed Maine lobster.
Make your steak extra special at Steak 48 with indulgent toppings like truffle sauteed lobster.
Steak 48

Truluck's

Though best known for its giant crab claws, Truluck’s is also known to serve up a melt-in-your-mouth steak, including a New York strip that’s wet-aged for 60 days, and a barrel cut filet, in a romantic ambiance, complete with live music from a piano. Also packing the flavor is the off-the-menu bone-in rib-eye, which is offered on a first-come, first-serve basis. an

Doris Metropolitan Houston

A New Orleans export, Doris Metropolitan brings plenty of flair and lots of flavor to Space City. Dig into steaks that are dry-aged at the restaurant, ranging from a 9-ounce “classified cut” to the hulking 34-ounce porterhouse. Wagyu beef from Japan and Texas are also on offer, and don’t sleep on the sides — from asparagus gratin to Israeli salad with tahini.

Related Maps

Chama Gaúcha

A steakhouse list isn’t complete without a Brazilian steakhouse, and at Chama, the meats keep coming. So long as your service button is switched from red to green, trained chefs will greet you with skewers of meat, including prime cuts of sirloin, pork ribs and loins, linguica, lamb, and filet mignon — all charcoal-grilled and sliced before your eyes.

Pappas Bros. Steakhouse

As the O.G. of Houston’s steak scene, there’s no better service or steak in town than at this Westheimer institution. The beef is USDA Prime and aged in-house, the wine list is ridiculously comprehensive, and starters like Pappas’ iconic turtle soup and lobster mac and cheese offer an excellent complement to a rib-eye, NY strip, or filet.

Gatsby's

Gatsby’s plated rib-eye with a glass of red wine.
Gatbsy’s harnesses the expertise of its executive chef Erick Anaya to serve some of the best steaks the city has to offer.
Gatsby’s Prime Steakhouse

Located near Houston’s Museum District, Gatbsy’s is helmed by executive chef Erick Anaya who brings more than 20 years of steakhouse experience to the table. Start with the deluxe deviled eggs topped with fried shrimp and bacon jam or baked oysters on the half shell before diving into a delightful menu of plenty turf. Opt for the 16-ounce Delmonico steak, two cuts of rib-eye, or the Gatsby’s chicken, and pair with a side or two. You can’t miss with the lobster mac and cheese and onion rings.

Gatsby’s plated rib-eye with a glass of red wine.
Gatbsy’s harnesses the expertise of its executive chef Erick Anaya to serve some of the best steaks the city has to offer.
Gatsby’s Prime Steakhouse

Tony's

The steak menu is strong at Tony’s, in part due to many loyal cooks who have prepared meat at the restaurant during its 35 years. The 55-day dry-aged rib-eye is 100 percent prime, and its artisan-style dry-aging process results in a buttery, full-flavored bite, but there is also the option to have it “Tony’s Way” which includes porcini mushroom, fonda Bruno sauce, and roasted bone marrow. On the hunt for something extravagant? Find fatty A5, BMS 12 Miyazaki wagyu beef here, presented seared and sliced by the ounce.

Killen's Steakhouse

Chef Ronnie Killen’s steakhouse — with locations in Pearland and in the Woodlands — is an absolute staple. Traditional dry or wet-aged Prime corn-fed beef, wagyu, and grass-fed steaks are on the menu, and a flight of New York strip allows diners to try a variety of beefy options. Don’t forget to save room for mouthwatering sides like skillet potatoes and broccoli-cheese risotto.

Related Maps